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cosmopolitan international city, were east meets west. then and now, muslims and christians on mexico exist to a different degree and the american missionary presence in the middle east was significant in beirut and it became sort of launching pad for creating what became the greatest university in the region because of this action. >> at the university happened but in another middle eastern city and survived? >> perhaps, but the american presence was no greater anywhere else in addition to being ambition is an visionary and practical and compassionate come was very picchu radically american. he wanted to create a school that was not going to be controlled by other nationalities or other interests. he wanted a score that represented the american model of education, that this american values and key people in the middle east and awareness that american education was something that would benefit their lives every day in tangible ways and he succeeded. >> why is it important to tell the story? >> has most middle easterners and americans for example are aware of this longer, deeper, humanitaria
international center. friday december 14 city club will host dan cronin, president of the io of the national association and homelessness. these visit our website, city club.org for information about her upcoming foreign or to listen to a podcast of past programs. we'd like to welcome our guests at tables hosted by humana. and medical mutual. thank you for your support. would also like to welcome to today's program students who are joining us from the area high schools. student participation is made possible by generous gift from a charitable trust her today we welcome students from jcpenney school. students, please stand and be reckoned as. [applause] now we would like to return to her speaker for a traditional city club question and answer. we welcome questions for my phone, putting guests. holding the microphone today is kerry miller. we have our first question please. >> mr. brousard commie talk about complexities facing the average american patient. certainly insurance exchanges in the next year or so will make it more complex. [inaudible] in the drafting of the affordable care act. why
or three-day massacre of the city or a chemical -- use of chemical weapon s that would galvanize an international response and compel the international community to respond. so it's been more this piece-by-piece and has to do with the various limitations on the syrian army and the trust tt worthy elements of the syrian army. but i would blame the government most of all for that initial reaction. >> thank you. yes. >> yes, personally don't think we should have gone the middle east in a war for any reason, but bush had to have his war. the russians failed, the british failed. don't you think we started all these clans and these factions -- haven't we stirred them up by starting these things we did? can you comment on that? >> comment on how we can -- >> well, not on -- well, you kind of tried to say what we could do, but didn't we serve all this stuff up anyway going into iraq? >> oh, yes, yes. >> the clans, the factions. if the british couldn't do it and the -- what made us think we could do anything? >> you know, it's -- everyone thinks they can do it better. everyone thinks they
on the northern cities that we associate with, but in the rural and small-town south through more garbage out in the southern states than there are anywhere else in the united states and it's also an international movement sewing really cover really interested in this and one of the things i discovered in the book is finishing the nation under our feet i was having to rely on what i thought would be a secondary literature on the movement in the united states and i discover they're basically was one the there is a lot who as you know is a controversial figure but in terms of who joined, who was moved by it, who embraced the vision and with the understanding was, there was virtually nothing so the kind of cobbled things together and i thought i really need to know more about this. and one of the things in this book is what historians don't write about and why. there are certain episodes or certain interpretations that scare you in the face but somehow you refuse them or ignore them, and darbee is really one of them. almost any historian conversing with african-american history would acknowledge
cities that we associate with it, but in the rural and small towns south. there were more in the southern states than there are anywhere else in the united states, and it's also an international movement so i was really, really interested in this, and one of the things i discovered in this, and the reason it's in the book, is that as i finished "nation under our feet," i thought i'd rely on a secondary literature on the movement in the united states, and i discovered there basically was known. there's a lot on garby, himself, a very controversial figure, but in terms of who joined the unia, who was moved by it, who embraced the vision and what their understanding was, there was virtually nothing, and so in in "nation under our feet," i cobbled things together, and i thought i really need to know more about this. a theme in the book is what historians don't write about and why. why is it that there's certain episodes or certain interpretations that stare you in the face, but somehow you refuse them or ignore them, and he's really one of almost any historian with african-american history wo
corporation. next friday, december 7, the city club welcomes aaron david miller, vice president of new initiatives and distinguished scholar at the woodrow wilson international center for scholars. friday, december 14th. the city club will host an roman, president and ceo of the national association to end homelessness. please visit our web site, ski club.org, for information about our upcoming forum or to listen to a podcast of any of our past programs. we'll like to welcome guests from human in humana care, and mutual. thank you for your support. we would like to welcome to today's programs students who are joining us from area high school. student participation is made possible by a generous gift from the chars sparr trust. will the students please stand and be recognize it. [applause] >> now we would like to return to our speaker for our traditional city club question and answer period. we welcome questions from everyone, including guests, holding the microphone today is program directer kerry miller, may we have our first question, please. >> mr. broussard, you talked about the co
, bringing people from outside washington into washington. it depends from city-to-city. boston business leaders are interested in health care. miami, transportation, san diego, international -- an intellectual property -- it varies from city-to-city. in terms of immigration reform, what we have seen as different sectors of the economy look at immigration differently. the high-tech community is looking at bringing in more high-skilled workers or keeping graduates in the united states to help them with challenges in computer sciences, for example, or health sciences. you have the hotel industry and the airline industry focused on trying to make sure that travel visas are administered more efficiently so we can bring in more tourists to spend more money. you have the industry sectors with an interest in immigration. our view is immigration reform will be a big issue in 2013 and you will see big companies across sectors working together, combining shared interests to get something done. host: here is a tweet from one of our viewers -- how does the national debt directly effect businesses, o
totally carry this, my sons would carry this. >>guest: my son is a lawyer in new york city he does not check luggage. he was like i want the black. i was like ok. you are not getting it yet. >>host: it is very classy. my son is a huge international traveler, same thing. and they are picky. they want to look nice.if you are shopping for your son or grandson or a son-in-3 they traveled little bit, this is an incredible gift. >>guest: or the husband or men in your life. >>host: for us, you can see how classy this looks. >>guest: the black is pretty. >>host: it is hard to pick. >>guest: i want to open up the browned. this becomes your trunk. -- you could take the drawers out and lay it down like itor regular suitcase. i have boots slippers. you can fit so much,2500 cubic inches of storage capacity. then you zip it up so you never need to pack or unpack when you go anywhere. you get the shoulder strap for the barrel-tote. luggage cuff. it snaps on the handle and even on your if you want to. then you get the hanging toiletry bag we put a carry-on luggage. and you get the luggag
is working closely with international part is to end the violent conflict between the congolese army and backed by rwanda. rebels captured the eastern congo city of goma. this is just two and a half hours. >> the committee will come to order. good afternoon. i apologize for the lateness in starting. today will regard the policy in the democratic republic of congo. this conflict was exacerbated by rwanda's interventions in neighboring eastern congo as documented by the release of three united nations reports this year. these reports confirm rwanda supported militia who have lavished in continue to plague this region. the state department was unavailable to testify at her september 19. on this issue and the promise that the time to follow up with available to testify. in the aftermath of genocide, they've turned a blind eye to reports of resources from the drc and support issuing congo and its people. it seems the guilt of the clinton administration's colossal failure responding effectively as they did not commit genocide in rwanda has led to subsequent been reluctant to criticize her
. but internally you have tribal rivalries that have to be played out or sometimes a u.s. corporation in one city with one group of people creates resentment among and other. there want to rebuild neighborhoods, but they don't want to be seen as lackeys of the americans. gives you a strange dynamic and gives you insight into the impact that history has been to the support of the world that is used to congress for thousands of years. it been able to create a relationship and hedge their bets. apart from the human tragedies, your heart breaks when you read about someone he just had a baby a few days earlier, spoke to his wife before he went on a mission and nine helicopter crash. your heart breaks and reminds you of the human cost and also reminds you of the logistical challenge. >> did this book makes you regret operation afghanistan? >> no. i just think it reminds us of the challenges of the. the end of the day after ana says it -- afghanistan is important. you don't want to create a safe haven for people to the be able to come back and reconstitute, but it's also about pakistan. to have an unsta
in my campus community, made a commitment to invest in the city as well which was really the turning point in my life and set me on a completely different trajectory. i was president of my student body, i interned for congressman joseph p. kennedy who has since required, a congressman -- retired. i then went on to work for united states senator john kerry for 11 years and ultimately was recruited to run for office, was elected in 2009. i am 38. this is where you say i look much younger than that. [laughter] i love coming to this space, good lighting. [laughter] but i think, again, i can speak to this personally because now that i am an elected official, the only woman serving on that body and the first woman of color in that body in its history -- mass. [applause] now, why does that matter, why is that relevant? i appreciate the applause, it has nothing to do with a personal achievement. i think it's a shared victory for all of us. it means that the solutions we're developing in government are more comprehensive and fully informed because of that perspective. so i've thought a great
countries and the internally displaced persons to hold the region's. at the same time, as logistically challenging as it may be, holding elections in the major cities and in the northern regions would be this strong guest impossible of mali's sovereignty or territory and steps of rebuilding a democracy. the transition government is government plans and actions to the public and the crisis of legitimacy. the international community needs to harmonize its approach toward the pursuit of the polls that could lead to the legitimately elected government and military actions to detect the north. the contradictory public that take the military option off the table in the short and medium-term may only serve to emboldened the extra hauling them time to reinforce their presence. such also exacerbate fear there may be a conspiracy to breakout and to the civilian space rule out the hand of the pro-democracy forces within the country and for the work that is deeply invested in the space rule. many malians were proud of the country's democracy to consolidating the need by strengthening institutions
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12

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